TOP 100+ Cell Cycle And Cell Division MCQ and Answers

These Cell Cycle And Cell Division MCQ and Answers are composed by our livemcqs team speacially for NEET, AIIMS and other Medical Entrance aspirents. These Cell Cycle MCQs covers the all concepts of the Chapter 10 of Class 11 Biology. You can download these Questions by clicking the Link “Cell Cycle And Cell Division Mcq For Neet Pdf” given below.

Cell Cycle And Cell Division MCQ and Answers

1. Which of these is the most eventful period of the cell cycle?

a) G1 phase
b) G2 phase
c) S phase
d) M phase

Answer: d

Explanation: G1 phase, G2 phase and M phase are stages of the resting phase, known as interphase. Although cell growth and DNA replication take place during interphase, it is lesser than the events taking place during mitosis or M phase.

2. What is the phenomenon of nuclear division known as?

a) Telekinesis
b) Cytokinesis
c) Karyokinesis
d) Autokinesis

Answer: c

Explanation: The phenomenon of nuclear division is known as karyokinesis. Cell division is known as cytokinesis. These events take place in the cell during mitosis. Mitosis is terminated with cell division or cytokinesis.

3. Which of these events is not a part of karyokinesis?

a) Metaphase
b) Prophase
c) Interphase
d) Anaphase

Answer: c

Explanation: Interphase or the resting period is not a part of karyokinesis. Karyokinesis involves nuclear division. The stages of M phase, namely, metaphase, anaphase and prophase are a part of karyokinesis.

4. In which phase is chromosome condensation initiated?

a) Prophase
b) Metaphase
c) Anaphase
d) Telophase

Answer: a

Explanation: Initiation of chromosomal condensation takes place in the M phase of the cell cycle. It marks the starting of cell division. Hence, it takes place in the first stage of M phase, that is, prophase.

5. What happens to the chromosome during chromatin condensation?

a) It becomes tangled
b) It becomes detangled
c) It undergoes temporary denaturation
d) It undergoes inactivation

Answer: b

Explanation: The densely coiled chromatin or chromosome fibers become detangled during the condensation of chromatin. This is an early event of the cell cycle and takes place in the prophase phase.

6. In which phase do the centrosomes start moving to the opposite poles of the cell?

a) Anaphase
b) Metaphase
c) Prophase
d) Telophase

Answer: c

Explanation: The centrosome is located just outside the nucleus. During S phase, it undergoes replication. During prophase of M phase or mitosis, they start moving towards the opposite ends of the cell.

7. Which of these structures is the site of attachment of chromatids?

a) Centromere
b) Aster
c) Kinetochore
d) Centrosome

Answer: a

Explanation: Chromatids are attached to each other at the centromere. Kinetochores are the point of attachment of chromatids on the spindle fibers. Centrosome is a structure present outside the nucleus.

8. What are asters made of?

a) Collagen
b) Intermediate filaments
c) Actin fibers
d) Microtubules

Answer: d

Explanation: Asters are made out of microtubules, which are a type of cytoskeletal proteins of the cell. Asters radiate from centrosomes on the opposite poles of the cells during the M phase of cell division.

9. What are the constituents of the mitotic apparatus?

a) Chromatids, Centrosomes
b) Chromatids, Spindle fibers
c) Asters, Spindle fibers
d) Kinetochores, Centrosomes

Answer: c

Explanation: The mitotic apparatus consists of asters and spindle fibers. Asters radiate out from the centrosomes present on the opposite poles of the cell. They are made out of microtubules which are cytoskeletal proteins.

10. Which of these structures are visible under the microscope at the end of prophase?

a) Nucleolus
b) Endoplasmic reticulum
c) Golgi bodies
d) Asters

Answer: d

Explanation: Prophase is the first phase of the M phase or the mitotic phase. At the end of prophase, the nucleolus, Golgi bodies and the endoplasmic reticulum are not visible. Asters are visible. They radiate in all directions from the centrosomes.

11. In which phase does the nuclear envelope disintegrate?

a) Telophase
b) Prophase
c) Metaphase
d) Anaphase

Answer: c

Explanation: The nuclear envelope starts disintegrating in the prophase phase of the M phase. However, it is completely disintegrated in the metaphase stage. It is the second phase of mitosis or M phase.

12. In which phase of mitosis can the chromosomes be studied easily?

a) Prophase
b) Anaphase
c) Metaphase
d) Telophase

Answer: c

Explanation: In the metaphase stage of mitosis or M phase, the chromosomes are spread out throughout the cytoplasm and not confined to the nucleus. They are highly condensed and hence can be studied easily.

13. What is the shape of a kinetochore?

a) Disc-shaped
b) Cylindrical
c) Spherical
d) Triangular

Answer: a

Explanation: The kinetochore is a small disc-shaped structure. They are present on centromeres, which are the place of attachment of sister chromatids. The kinetochores are the sites of attachment of chromatids to the spindle fibers.

14. Which of these events do not take place during metaphase?

a) Chromosomes lie at the equator of the cell
b) One chromatid of each chromosome is attached to the spindle fiber
c) Chromosomes spread throughout the cytoplasm
d) Nuclear envelope starts to disintegrate

Answer: d

Explanation: During metaphase, the nuclear envelope has completely disintegrated. The chromosomes spread out throughout the cytosol and the chromosomes lie at the equatorial plane, attached to spindle fibers.

15. Which phase is marked by the separation of sister chromatids?

a) Prophase
b) Metaphase
c) Anaphase
d) Telophase

Answer: c

Explanation: Anaphase is the third stage of M phase or mitosis. It succeeds metaphase, the phase during which the chromosomes align themselves along the equator of the cell. In anaphase, they start separating towards the poles.

Cell Cycle MCQs and Answers

16. In which direction does each chromatid move on separation of sister chromatids?

a) Towards the nuclear envelope
b) Towards the equatorial plane
c) Towards the poles
d) Towards adjacent chromatids

Answer: c

Explanation: Separation of the sister chromatids occurs during the third stage of mitosis or the M phase of the cell cycle, known as anaphase. The chromatids separate from each other and move to the opposite poles of the cell.

17. In which direction are the centromeres directed during separation of chromosomes?

a) Towards the poles
b) Towards the equatorial plane
c) Towards adjacent chromatids
d) Towards the nuclear envelope

Answer: a

Explanation: Separation of the sister chromatids occurs during the third stage of mitosis, known as anaphase. The centromeres of each chromatid are directed towards the poles while the arms of the chromosomes trail behind them.

18. What is the final stage of karyokinesis?

a) Prophase
b) G2 phase
c) Telophase
d) G1 phase

Answer: c

Explanation: Karyokinesis is the division of the nucleus. This proceeds after the genetic material has been replicated and the sister chromatids have undergone separation. Thus, the final stage of karyokinesis is telophase, which is the last stage of mitosis.

19. Which of these events does not take place during telophase?

a) Chromosomes are distinct and clear
b) Chromosomes are present at the poles
c) Chromosomes are decondensed
d) Chromosomes lose their individuality

Answer: a

Explanation: Telophase is the last stage of mitosis or the M phase of cell cycle. During telophase, the chromosomes are present at the poles. They lose their individuality and are decondensed. They cannot be clearly visualized.

20. During which stage of the cell cycle does the nuclear envelope reform?

a) G1 phase
b) Cytokinesis
c) Anaphase
d) Telophase

Answer: d

Explanation: The nuclear envelope reforms after the division of the sister chromatids and their migration to the opposite poles of the cell. Hence, it reforms during the last stage of mitosis, telophase.

21. During which stage of cell cycle do the major organelles reform?

a) Prophase
b) Anaphase
c) Telophase
d) G2 phase

Answer: c

Explanation: The major organelles of the cell, such as the nucleolus, the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum, are reformed after the sister chromatids have separated and migrated to the opposite poles, during telophase.

22. Why do plants not undergo furrowing during cytokinesis?

a) Absence of centrioles
b) Presence of rigid vascular bundle
c) Presence of cell wall
d) Presence of large vacuoles

Answer: c

Explanation: Animal cells undergo furrowing during cell division or cytokinesis. The furrow deepens, ultimately forming two cells. The presence of a relatively inextensible cell wall prevents furrowing in plant cells.

23. From where does wall formation start between two newly formed plant cells?

a) Cell wall
b) Cell membrane
c) Centre of the cell
d) Cytoplasm

Answer: c

Explanation: The presence of a relatively inextensible cell wall prevents furrowing in plant cells. The plant cells instead undergo separation by cell plate formation that starts from the center of the plant cell.

24. The cell-plate of plant cells represents the ______

a) middle lamella
b) primary cell wall
c) secondary cell wall
d) plasmodesmata

Answer: a

Explanation: Plant cells undergo separation by cell-plate formation that starts from the center of the plant cell. It does not undergo furrowing like animal cells. The cell-plate represents the middle lamella.

25. Which of these is an example of syncytium in coconut?

a) Fleshy endosperm
b) Liquid endosperm
c) Endocarp
d) Mesocarp

Answer: b

Explanation: Syncytium is a cytoplasmic mass of cells that are multinucleated. This multinucleate condition arises due to absence of cytokinesis or cell division following karyokinesis or nuclear division.

Cell Cycle And Cell Division Class 11 NEET Questions

26. Which of these statements is not true about fertilization?

a) The gametes are haploid
b) Gametes develop from diploid cells
c) It involves the fusion of two gametes
d) Gametes have an incomplete set of chromosomes

Answer: d

Explanation: Fertilization involves the fusion of two gametes to produce an offspring. These gametes develop from diploid cells and are haploid. However, they possess the complete set of chromosomes.

27. Which of these processes ensure the haploid phase of life cycle?

a) Fission
b) Mitosis
c) Meiosis
d) Fertilization

Answer: c

Explanation: The haploid phase of life cycle occurs when the total chromosome number inside the cell is reduced to half. It occurs by the process of meiosis. Fertilization restores the diploid phase of life cycle.

28. Which of these processes involve meiosis?

a) Atherogenesis
b) Organogenesis
c) Gametogenesis
d) Embryogenesis

Answer: c

Explanation: Gametogenesis is the formation of gametes from some specialized diploid cells. Since gametes are haploid, gametogenesis involves in the reduction of chromosome number by half through meiosis.

29. Meiosis involves one cycle of ______

a) DNA replication
b) cytokinesis
c) karyokinesis
d) separation of chromosomes

Answer: a

Explanation: Meiosis is divided into two stages- meiosis I and meiosis II. In each stage, the cell undergoes separation of chromosomes during anaphase I and anaphase II, cytokinesis and karyokinesis.

30. Which of these undergo recombination?

a) Homologous chromosomes
b) Non-homologous chromosomes
c) Non-sister chromatids
d) Sister chromatids

Answer: b

Explanation: Non-sister chromatids of homologous chromosomes undergo recombination during meiosis, during which their genetic material is exchanged. This increases the genetic diversity of the species.

31. How many cells are formed at the end of meiosis I?

a) 2 haploid cells
b) 4 diploid cells
c) 2 diploid cells
d) 4 haploid cells

Answer: c

Explanation: Meiosis 1 involves one round of cell division in which the tetrad is separated into two daughter cells. Hence, from 4n of tetrad, two daughter cells each having 2n chromosomes are formed.

32. Arrange the phases of prophase I in order.

a) Leptotene → Zygotene → Pachytene → Diplotene
b) Zygotene → Leptotene → Pachytene → Diplotene
c) Leptotene → Pachytene → Zygotene → Diplotene
d) Zygotene → Leptotene → Diplotene → Pachytene

Answer: a

Explanation: Prophase 1 is the first stage of meiosis. It is the first step of meiosis 1. It is divided into four sub-phases-namely, Leptotene, Zygotene, Pachytene and Diplotene. Diplotene is followed by diakinesis.

33. Compaction of chromosomes occurs during ______

a) zygotene
b) pachytene
c) diplotene
d) leptotene

Answer: d

Explanation: Chromosomes have to become decondensed and compact before they can undergo cell division. Hence, chromosomal compaction occurs during the leptotene stage of prophase I of meiosis I.

34. What is the chromosomal association process in zygotene called?

a) Zygote
b) Tetrad
c) Synapsis
d) Chiasmata

Answer: c

Explanation: Zygotene is the second stage of prophase I of meiosis I. The compact chromosomes begin to associate with each other during this phase, and this association process is known as synapsis.

35. During which stage of prophase I does synapsis occur?

a) Pachytene
b) Leptotene
c) Diplotene
d) Zygotene

Answer: d

Explanation: Synapsis is the process of association of compact chromosomes after the first phase of prophase I, leptotene. It occurs in the second phase known as the zygotene phase. The chromosomes pair with each other during synapsis.

36. Which of these following statements is false about synapsis?

a) Pairs of homologous chromosomes are formed
b) It occurs during zygotene
c) It results in tetravalent formation
d) It is accompanied by synaptonemal complex formation

Answer: c

Explanation: Synapsis is the process of chromosomal association that takes place in the zygotene stage of prophase I. It results in pairing of homologous chromosomes and involves synaptonemal complex formation. It results in bivalent formation.

37. During which stage do the chromatids of a bivalent become distinct?

a) Leptotene
b) Zygotene
c) Pachytene
d) Diplotene

Answer: c

Explanation: Bivalent or tetrad formation takes place during the zygotene stage of prophase I, after synapsis has occurred and homologous chromosomes form pairs. However, the bivalent is distinct only in the next stage, pachytene.

38. Crossing over takes place during _____

a) pachytene
b) zygotene
c) leptotene
d) diplotene

Answer: a

Explanation: Crossing over takes place after tetrad or bivalent formation by the process of synapsis during zygotene. Hence, crossing over takes place during pachytene. Crossing over leads to genetic diversity.

39. Which of these is true regarding crossing over?

a) Exchange occurs between non-homologous chromosomes
b) It involves recombination nodules
c) It is not mediated by enzymes
d) It occurs during zygotene

Answer: b

Explanation: Crossing over takes place during the pachytene stage of prophase I. It is enzyme mediated and involves recombination nodules. Exchange of genetic material occurs between homologous chromosomes.

40. What is the enzyme involved in crossing over?

a) Isomerase
b) Invertase
c) Transferase
d) Recombinase

Answer: d

Explanation: Crossing over or recombination takes place during the pachytene stage of prophase I. Crossing over is an enzyme-mediated phenomenon and the enzyme involved in this process is recombinase.

41. During which stage does the synaptonemal complex dissolve?

a) Leptotene
b) Pachytene
c) Diplotene
d) Zygotene

Answer: c

Explanation: The synaptonemal complex is formed in the second stage of prophase I, that is, zygotene stage. After crossing over takes place during pachytene stage, the complex is dissolved during the diplotene stage.

42. What shape is the chiasmata?

a) S-shaped
b) Y-shaped
c) X-shaped
d) L-shaped

Answer: c

Explanation: The chiasmata is an X-shaped structure formed by the bivalents or the tetrads during prophase I of meiosis I. It occurs due to the tendency of the homologous chromosomes of a tetrad to move away from each other.

43. At what stage can one visualize chiasmata?

a) Diplotene
b) Pachytene
c) Leptotene
d) Zygotene

Answer: a

Explanation: Chiasmata is an X-shaped structure formed by the tetrad. It occurs due to the tendency of the homologous chromosomes of a tetrad to move away from each other except at the center. It occurs in the diplotene stage of prophase I.

44. During which stage does assembly of meiotic spindle take place?

a) Pachytene
b) Diakinesis
c) Metaphase I
d) Diplotene

Answer: b

Explanation: Diakinesis is the last stage of prophase I of meiosis I during which the assembly of spindle fibers takes place. Diakinesis is also characterized by the disappearance of the X-shape of chiasmata.

45. Which of these is true about anaphase I?

a) Sister chromatids remain attached at the centromeres
b) Bivalent is unequally separated
c) Homologous chromosomes remain together
d) It takes place before diakinesis

Answer: a

Explanation: During anaphase I of meiosis, the homologous chromosomes are separated and the bivalent is hence, equally divided. It takes place after diakinesis, which is a part of prophase I. Sister chromatids are not separated.

Cell Cycle And Division NEET Questions

46. Which of these stages is characterized by the disappearance of the nucleolus?

a) Zygotene
b) Pachytene
c) Diplotene
d) Diakinesis

Answer: d

Explanation: The disappearance of the nucleolus takes place during the last stage of prophase I, that is, diakinesis. This stage is also characterized by the disintegration of the nuclear membrane. It depicts transition to metaphase I.

47. During which stage of meiosis do the sister chromatids separate?

a) Telophase I
b) Anaphase I
c) Anaphase II
d) Telophase II

Answer: c

Explanation: During anaphase I, the tetrad is divided and hence the homologous chromosomes are separated. However, the sister chromatids remain attached to each other. During anaphase II, the sister chromatids are separated.

48. Which of the following statements is false regarding interkinesis?

a) It is mostly short lived
b) It is followed by prophase II
c) It occurs after telophase I
d) Replication takes place

Answer: d

Explanation: Interkinesis is the period between meiosis I and meiosis II. It is mostly short lived and occurs after telophase I. It is followed by prophase II. However, no DNA replication takes place during this period.

49. How do chromatids reach the poles of the cells during anaphase?

a) Action of centromeres
b) Disintegration of spindle fibers
c) Shortening of microtubules
d) Movement of arms of chromatids

Answer: c

Explanation: During anaphase, the chromatids are separated and start moving towards the poles from the metaphase plate. This occurs by the shortening of the microtubules which pulls the chromatids towards the poles.

50. The stage preceding the stage during which crossing over takes place is ______

a) diplotene
b) pachytene
c) zygotene
d) leptotene

Answer: c

Explanation: Crossing over and recombination takes place during the pachytene stage of prophase I. The stage preceding this is the zygotene stage which is characterized by the formation of the synaptonemal complex.

51. Which of these statements is true about meiosis I?

a) Crossing over leads to genetic variability
b) Diplotene is short lived in vertebrates
c) Diakinesis is followed by cytokinesis
d) Chiasmata formation occurs during metaphase I

Answer: a

Explanation: Diplotene can last for years in some vertebrates, hence it is not always short lived. Diakinesis is followed by metaphase I. Chiasmata is formed during diplotene. Crossing over leads to genetic variation.

52. Which of these processes is not a part of the cell cycle?

a) Duplication of genome
b) Division into daughter cells
c) Synthesis of cell organelles
d) Degeneration of centrosome

Answer: d

Explanation: Cell cycle involves duplication of the genome, division of the parent cell into two daughter cells, synthesis of cell organelles for the daughter cells, but centrosomes are not degenerated.

53. Which of these is the correct order of events in the cell cycle?

a) G1 → G2 → S → M
b) G1 → G2 → M → S
c) G1 → S → G2 → M
d) S → M → G1 → G2

Answer: c

Explanation: The cell cycle starts with the first gap phase or G1, followed by the synthesis phase or S phase. This is followed by the second gap phase or G2. These are parts of the interphase, which is then followed by the M phase.

54. What is the duration of cell cycle in yeast?

a) 30 minutes
b) 24 hours
c) 90 minutes
d) 48 hours

Answer: c

Explanation: The duration of the cell cycle of the single celled fungi yeast takes 90 minutes. This means that it undergoes interphase and M phase to produce two new identical daughter cells through cell division.

55. The period between two M phases is called ______

a) interphase
b) prophase
c) prometaphase
d) telophase

Answer: a

Explanation: Two successive M phases or mitosis phases are separated by a period of rest known as interphase. It is the phase in which newly formed daughter cells actively grow and synthesize cellular material for the next M phase.

56. How much time of the entire cell cycle is occupied by interphase?

a) 75%
b) 95%
c) 50%
d) 80%

Answer: b

Explanation: The cell cycle is broadly classified into two phases-the interphase and the M phase. The M phase is the one in which actual cell division takes place. It occurs rapidly and takes up 95% of the duration of the cell cycle.

57. Which process does the M phase of cell cycle start with?

a) Karyokinesis
b) Cytokinesis
c) Interphase
d) Spindle formation

Answer: a

Explanation: The M phase of the cell cycle starts with karyokinesis or the separation of sister chromatids. It ends with cytokinesis or the division of the cytoplasm. The M phase occurs after interphase.

58. In which phase of the cell cycle does DNA replication take place?

a) Anaphase
b) Metaphase
c) Prophase
d) Interphase

Answer: d

Explanation: DNA replication or synthesis takes place in the resting phase or interphase of the cell cycle. It takes place during the S phase or synthesis phase. Prophase, metaphase and anaphase are a part of M phase.

59. What is the interval between mitosis and DNA replication?

a) S phase
b) G2 phase
c) G1 phase
d) M phase

Answer: c

Explanation: G1 phase or gap 1 phase is the interval between the end of mitosis or M phase and the beginning of the replication or the synthesis of DNA in the synthesis phase. G2 phase follows the S phase.

60. During S phase of the cell cycle, the amount of DNA ______

a) triples
b) remains the same
c) quadruples
d) doubles

Answer: d

Explanation: During S phase or synthesis phase, DNA synthesis or replication takes place. This is because at the end of every cell division, the cell splits into two daughter cells which have equal amount of DNA. Hence the amount of DNA doubles.

Cell Division MCQ For NEET

61. In which phase of the cell cycle does centriole duplication take place?

a) S phase
b) G2 phase
c) G1 phase
d) G0 phase

Answer: a

Explanation: Centriole duplication as well as DNA duplication or synthesis takes place in the S phase or the synthesis phase of the cell cycle. DNA duplication does not take place in the gap phases G1, G2 and G0.

62. Protein synthesis takes place in _____

a) G0 phase
b) G1 phase
c) G2 phase
d) S phase

Answer: c

Explanation: Proteins are synthesized in the interphase in order to help initiate the M phase or mitosis phase and so that the two daughter cells each receive adequate protein. It takes place in G2 phase.

63. Which of these cells do not divide?

a) Heart cells
b) Melanocytes
c) Osteocytes
d) Liver cells

Answer: a

Explanation: Melanocytes, osteocytes and liver cells show cell division. Heart cells do not show cell division as the cells have exited the G1 or first gap phase in order to enter a quiescent stage or the G0 phase.

64. In which of these animals does a haploid cell divide mitotically?

a) Humans
b) Male honey bees
c) Female honey bees
d) Rats

Answer: b

Explanation: Haploid cells which have only one copy of chromosomes divide mitotically in male honey bees. This is in contrast to the general pattern of haploid germ cells dividing meiotically in most animals.

Cell Cycle And Cell Division MCQ For NEET PDF

Biology Class 11 Chapter-wise Questions and Answers

Chapter 1: The Living World
Chapter 2: Biological Classification
Chapter 3: Plant Kingdom
Chapter 4: Animal Kingdom
Chapter 5: Morphology of Flowering Plants
Chapter 6: Anatomy of Flowering Plants
Chapter 7: Structural Organisation in Animals
Chapter 8: Cell: The Unit of Life
Chapter 9: Biomolecules
Chapter 10: Cell Cycle and Cell Division
Chapter 11: Transport in Plants
Chapter 12: Mineral Nutrition
Chapter 13: Photosynthesis in Higher Plants
Chapter 14: Respiration in Plants
Chapter 15: Plant Growth and Development
Chapter 16: Digestion and Absorption
Chapter 17: Breathing and Exchange of Gases
Chapter 18: Body Fluids and Circulation
Chapter 19: Excretory Products and Their Elimination
Chapter 20: Locomotion and Movement
Chapter 21: Neural Control and Coordination
Chapter 22: Chemical Coordination and Integration

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