Message Oriented Communication in Distributed Computing

Distributed computing is one of the most active areas of research and development in Information Technology. Many organizations use distributed systems and applications to achieve a competitive advantage. Distributed systems and applications are now being used in commercial, industrial, financial, military, and even domestic environments.

Message Oriented Communication (MOC) is a fundamental model for all distributed applications. MOC refers to the communication between two applications through messages that are exchanged over the network. The term “message” refers to data that is exchanged between two applications.

What is Message Oriented Communication in Distributed Computing?

Message Oriented Communication (MOC) is the most common means of communication between distributed systems. It works by creating messages that are passed between processing nodes. There are several key properties of MOC that make it a good fit for distributed computing:

Loose coupling: The sending and receiving processes don’t need to know each other or their network details to communicate.

Asynchronous communication: Messaging creates a decoupling of data, so the sender and receiver do not need to be running at the same time. This allows distributed systems to remain responsive even if parts of them are down or slow.

Guaranteed delivery: Messages can be persistently stored and guaranteed to be delivered, even if the sender and receiver are not online at the same time.

Use of Message Oriented Communication

The use of message-oriented communication is becoming increasingly popular. The advantages of using message queues and messaging systems are many:

The sender and receiver of the message do not need to interact with the message queue at the same time. In fact, the sender does not need to know if a receiver even exists.

Message queues provide an asynchronous communications protocol, meaning that the sender and receiver of the message do not need to interact with the message queue at the same time. In fact, the sender does not need to know if a receiver even exists. The sender can deliver its messages to the queue without having to wait for the receiver to fetch them; in this respect, message queues differ from normal function calls or remote procedure calls.

Message queues can be used both for one-way messaging (i.e., fire-and-forget) as well as request/reply scenarios, in which case a temporary reply queue is created by the receiver and its reference is included with each request that it sends so that replies may be routed back to it.

Related:

Message Oriented Communication in Distributed SystemMessage Oriented Architecture Patterns
What is Message Oriented Communication?What is Message Oriented Middleware?
What are Message Oriented Middleware Examples?What is Message Oriented Architecture?

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