Structure and Organisation of Villages and Towns during Colonialism of India MCQs

1. What was the primary reason for the establishment of villages and towns during colonialism in India?

a. To exploit the natural resources of the region

b. To gain political and military influence

c. To create new markets for goods and services

d. To provide stable and reliable source of labor

Answer: d

Explanation: The primary reason for the establishment of villages and towns during colonialism in India was gain the political and military influence. The villages and towns were also seen as a way to further the British economic interests in India. The villages and towns were developed as marketplaces where British goods could be sold. They were also used as centers of administration and control.

The establishment of villages and towns also had a social impact. The villages and towns were often seen as a way to bring Western culture to India. This process of Westernization often led to the displacement of traditional Indian practices and values.


2. Which of the following was NOT a consequence of the establishment of villages and towns during colonialism in India?

a. Violent conflict between villages and towns

b. Increased economic opportunities for villagers and townspeople

c. Improved infrastructure and services

d. Greater social and religious cohesion

Answer: b

Explanation: The establishment of villages and towns during colonialism in India had a number of consequences, both positive and negative. One negative consequence was increased conflict between villages and towns. This was due to the fact that villages and towns were often in competition for resources, and the arrival of colonial powers often tipped the balance in favor of towns. Another consequence was the improved infrastructure and services in towns, which led to increased economic opportunities for villagers and townspeople. Finally, the establishment of villages and towns also led to greater social and religious cohesion, as people from different backgrounds were brought together in one place.


3. How did the villages and towns established during colonialism in India differ from traditional Indian villages and towns?

a. They were located in more remote and inaccessible areas

b. They were typically much smaller in size

c. They were isolated with poor tracks

d. They were governed by colonial officials rather than traditional village or town leaders

Answer: c

Explanation: The villages and towns established during colonialism in India were very different from traditional Indian villages and towns. They were often laid out in a grid pattern, with wide streets and large houses and isolated with poor tracks. There was usually a central square or marketplace, and the houses were often built around this. There was often a church or other government building at one end of the square.


4. Which of the following was an important factor in the development of towns during colonialism in India?

a. The availability of cheap labor

b. The proximity to natural resources

c. The availability of transportation and communication networks

d. The presence of colonial administrators and military personnel

Answer: d

Explanation: The British East India Company’s establishment of trading posts in the 17th and 18th centuries was an important factor in the development of towns during colonialism in India.

The East India Company, a private company, was given the power to govern the Indian subcontinent by Queen Elizabeth I in 1600. The company’s primary aim was to build trade routes and to increase its profits. In order to do this, they needed to establish a presence in India.

To do this, they set up trading posts across the country and exported goods back to England. These trading posts were also used as military outposts from which they could control more territory. They eventually came into conflict with the Mughal Empire which ruled over most of the subcontinent at that time.


5. How were villages and towns typically structured during colonial rule in India?

a. According to the wishes of the British authorities

b. In a haphazard manner

c. So that they resembled British towns and villages

d. With a strong focus on community spirit

Answer: d

Explanation: The villages and towns were typically structured during colonial rule in India in a hierarchical system with a strong focus on community spirit. The villages were usually divided into two groups: the zamindars and the peasants. The zamindars were usually at the top of the hierarchy, followed by the Brahmin, Kshatriya, Vaishya and finally Shudra.


6. _________ is one of the main positive contributions made by the British in India.

a. Construction of all-weather roads

b. Introduction of railways

c. Development of inland trade and sea lanes

d. None of these

Answer: b

Explanation: Introduction of railways is one of the main positive contributions made by the British in India. The Indian Railways is one of the largest railway networks in the world, transporting over multi-million passengers a day.


7. Which of the following was not the characteristic of roads under the British rule?

a) Serve the purpose of mobilizing army

b) Drawing our raw material to the nearest railway station

c) All-weather roads were developed

d) None of these

Answer: c

Explanation: During the British rule, there was some infrastructural development in areas such as roads, railways, ports, water transport, posts, and telegraphs. But the motive behind this development was simply to foster the colonial interest of the British government. They were never interested in the growth of Indian economy. these infractures like road etc. were used to mobilize the army and carriying out raw materials.


8. Choose the wrong statements which state about infrastructure condition on the eve of India’s independence.

a) Roads were constructed by Britishers primarily for movement of army.

b) Railways were introduced in 1820.

c) Indian exports expanded during this period.

d) Britishers took measures to develop inland trade and sea routes

Answer: b

Explanation: Indian railways was introduced in 1853. Lord Dalhousie was the British Governor-General who introduced railways in India: He served as Governor-General of India from 1848 to 1856. He is popularly known as the “father of the Indian railway”.


9. Which of the given statement is true regarding the condition of Infrastructure?

a) Balanced regional development in infrastructure in all the areas

b) Development in the areas of transport and communication

c) No development in the area of road and railways

d) Barter system was still prevailing

Answer: b

Explanation: The British rule in India was marked by a number of developments in the areas of transport and communication. The development of railways, for example, had a significant impact on the lives of people.

A major development that took place during the British era was the establishment of railways. The first railway line in India was laid between Bombay and Thane in 1853. This helped to connect different parts of India with one another, which led to an increase in trade and commerce.


10. Which one of the following is not the impact of almost two centuries long British rule?

a) Agriculture sector has surplus labor and low productivity.

b) Infrastructure facilities need up-gradation and expansion

c) Occupational structure show signs of improvement as people started to shift from agriculture to industries.

d) Industries crying for diversification

Answer: c

Explanation: India is a developing country with a large population and an agrarian society. The Indian economy became agrarian with 70-75% of workforce depending on the agricultural sector for livelihood, while the rest depended on secondary and tertiary sectors.


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